A structural homologue of the plant receptor D14 mediates responses to strigolactones in the fungal phytopathogen Cryphonectria parasitica

Valentina Fiorilli, Marco Forgia, Alexandre de Saint Germain, Giulia D’Arrigo, David Cornu, Philippe Le Bris, Salim Al-Babili, Francesca Cardinale, Cristina Prandi, Francesca Spyrakis, François-Didier Boyer, Massimo Turina, Luisa Lanfranco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Strigolactones (SLs) are plant hormones and important signaling molecules required to promote the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis. While in plants an α/β-hydrolase, DWARF14 (D14), was shown to act as a receptor that binds and cleaves SLs, the fungal receptor for SLs is unknown. Since AM fungi are currently not genetically tractable, in this study, we used the fungal pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica for which gene deletion protocols exist, as a model, as we have previously shown that it responds to SLs. By means of computational, biochemical and genetic analyses we identified a D14 structural homologue, CpD14. Molecular homology modelling and docking support the prediction that CpD14 interacts with and hydrolyses SLs. The recombinant CpD14 protein shows α/β hydrolytic activity in vitro against the SLs synthetic analogue GR24; its enzymatic activity requires an intact Ser/His/Asp catalytic triad. CpD14 expression in the d14-1 loss-of-function Arabidopsis thaliana line did not rescue the plant mutant phenotype. However, gene inactivation by knock-out homologous recombination reduced fungal sensitivity to SLs. These results indicate that CpD14 is involved in SLs responses in C. parasitica and strengthen the role of SLs as multifunctional molecules acting in plant microbe-interactions.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNew Phytologist
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 4 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Medicine

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