Ammonia cracking for hydrogen production using a microwave argon plasma jet

Xinhua Zhang, Min Suk Cha*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Ammonia (NH3) is a promising hydrogen carrier that effectively connects producers of blue hydrogen with consumers, giving rapid conversion of ammonia to hydrogen a critical role in utilizing hydrogen at the endpoints of application in an ammonia-hydrogen economy. Because conventional thermal cracking of NH3 is an energy intensive process, requiring a relatively longer cold start duration, plasma technology is being considered as an assisting tool—or an alternative. Here we detail how an NH3 cracking process, using a microwave plasma jet (MWPJ) under atmospheric pressure, was governed by thermal decomposition reactions. We found that a delivered MW energy density (ED) captured the conversion of NH3 well, showing a full conversion for ED > 6 kJ l−1 with 0.5-% v/v NH3 in an argon flow. The hydrogen production rate displayed a linear increase with MW power and the NH3 content, being almost independent of a total flow rate. A simplified one-dimensional numerical model, adopting a thermal NH3 decomposition mechanism, predicted the experimental data well, indicating the importance of thermal decomposition in the plasma chemistry. We believe that such a prompt thermal reaction, caused by MW plasma, will facilitate a mobile and/or non-steady application. A process combined with the conventional catalytic method should also effectively solve a cold start issue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number065203
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume57
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 9 2024

Keywords

  • ammonia
  • cracking
  • hydrogen
  • microwave plasma
  • plasma chemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Ammonia cracking for hydrogen production using a microwave argon plasma jet'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this