Characterization and comparison of echolocation clicks of white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) off the Northumberland coast, UK

Liangliang Yang, Matt Sharpe, Andrew J. Temple, Per Berggren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Odontocetes produce ultrasonic clicks for navigation and foraging. These are commonly categorized as regular or buzz clicks based on the inter-click interval. Buzz clicks are linked to foraging behaviors and may be subdivided into slow buzz clicks for prey chase, and regular buzz clicks for prey capture. This study recorded these three click types produced by white-beaked dolphins (Lagenorhynchus albirostris) off the Northumberland coast, UK. Acoustic parameters (including duration, centroid frequency, and root-mean-squared bandwidth) were calculated and compared across the three click types. The results showed that the regular clicks had shorter durations and higher frequencies than both the buzz click types. The regular buzz clicks had longer durations, lower frequencies, and narrower bandwidths than the slow buzz clicks. Additionally, regardless of click type, about 30% of the clicks had high-frequency (200-250 kHz) secondary peaks and >90% of the clicks displayed spectral peak and notch patterns between 20 and 80 kHz. These findings are useful for future quantitative assessment of the echolocation performance of white-beaked dolphins in the wild. The patterns of spectral peaks and notches identified may facilitate for acoustic identification of this species.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1498-1506
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume149
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2021
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

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