Quantitative haplotype-resolved analysis of mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in Human single oocytes, blastoids, and pluripotent stem cells

Chongwei Bi, Lin Wang, Yong Fan, Baolei Yuan, Samhan Alsolami, Yingzi Zhang, Pu Yao Zhang, Yanyi Huang, Yang Yu, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, Mo Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Maternal mitochondria are the sole source of mtDNA for every cell of the offspring. Heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations inherited from the oocyte are a common cause of metabolic diseases and associated with late-onset diseases. However, the origin and dynamics of mtDNA heteroplasmy remain unclear. We used our individual Mitochondrial Genome sequencing (iMiGseq) technology to study mtDNA heterogeneity, quantitate single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and large structural variants (SVs), track heteroplasmy dynamics, and analyze genetic linkage between variants at the individual mtDNA molecule level in single oocytes and human blastoids. Our study presented the first single-mtDNA analysis of the comprehensive heteroplasmy landscape in single human oocytes. Unappreciated levels of rare heteroplasmic variants well below the detection limit of conventional methods were identified in healthy human oocytes, of which many are reported to be deleterious and associated with mitochondrial disease and cancer. Quantitative genetic linkage analysis revealed dramatic shifts of variant frequency and clonal expansions of large SVs during oogenesis in single-donor oocytes. iMiGseq of a single human blastoid suggested stable heteroplasmy levels during early lineage differentiation of naïve pluripotent stem cells. Therefore, our data provided new insights of mtDNA genetics and laid a foundation for understanding mtDNA heteroplasmy at early stages of life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3793-3805
Number of pages13
JournalNUCLEIC ACIDS RESEARCH
Volume51
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 8 2023

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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