Realising the Potential of Renewable Energy as a Tool for Energy Security in Small Island Developing States

Walter Leal Filho, Abdul Lateef Balogun, Dinesh Surroop, Amanda Lange Salvia, Kapil Narula, Chunlan Li, Julian David Hunt, Andrea Gatto, Ayyoob Sharifi, Haibo Feng, Stella Tsani, Hossein Azadi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Small Island Developing States (SIDS) are heavily dependent on the use of imported fossil fuels to address their energy needs. This has a negative impact on the environment, SIDS budgets, and energy security. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of renewable energy (RE) as a tool for energy security in SIDS. In this regard, using VOSviewer, a widely known software tool, two bibliometric analyses were performed with a focus on the literature that explores two intertwined issues: (i) the links between RE and energy security; and (ii) the implications of RE and energy security in SIDS. The results from the study show that RE can help SIDS enhance their energy security and assure long-term energy sustainability. In addition, the results show that with the reduction in the cost of batteries in the future, they will eventually replace diesel generators. Moreover, the study showed that renewable energy may assist SIDS in their long-term efforts to achieve food security. The analysis discusses the major obstacles and the potential solutions for the integration of RES into the energy generation of SIDS. The paper concludes with useful recommendations to help island nations reduce their carbon footprint.
Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalSustainability (Switzerland)
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Geography, Planning and Development

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