Smoking Cessation After Diagnosis of Kidney Cancer Is Associated With Reduced Risk of Mortality and Cancer Progression: A Prospective Cohort Study

Mahdi Sheikh, Anush Mukeriya, Hana Zahed, Xiaoshuang Feng, Hilary A. Robbins, Oxana Shangina, Vsevolod Matveev, Paul Brennan, David Zaridze

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSETo investigate whether postdiagnosis smoking cessation may affect the risk of death and disease progression in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) who smoked at the time of diagnosis.METHODSTwo hundred twelve patients with primary RCC were recruited between 2007 and 2016 from the Urological Department in N.N. Blokhin National Medical Research Center of Oncology, Moscow, Russia. Upon enrollment, a structured questionnaire was completed, and the patients were followed annually through 2020 to repeatedly assess their smoking status and disease progression. Survival probabilities and hazards for all-cause and cancer-specific mortality and disease progression were investigated using extended the Kaplan-Meier method, time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression, and Fine-Gray competing-risk models.RESULTSPatients were followed for a median of 8.2 years. During this time, 110 cases of disease progression, 100 total deaths, and 77 cancer-specific deaths were recorded. Eighty-four patients (40%) quit smoking after diagnosis. The total person-years at risk for this analysis were 748.2 for continuing smoking and 611.2 for quitting smoking periods. At 5 years of follow-up, both overall survival (85% v 61%) and progression-free survival (80% v 57%) rates were higher during the quitting than continuing smoking periods (both P
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2747-2755
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume41
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - May 20 2023
Externally publishedYes

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